Daily Archives: 03/07/2015

Friday sober jukebox – this is the day

So another run and another ace tune assaults my ear lobes!

the the soul mining

This takes me way way back to the start of my drinking career.  At sixth form college trying to fit in and be ‘cool’ (whatever that was!) and this song playing in the smoking room.  Yes we had a big old room for smoking where you could cut the haze with a knife!!  Was only 17, still wary and scared of drinking, from my childhood experiences, and trying it out.  I was on the cusp of my love affair with booze ….. and it did change things, but that was okay, and now it has changed things again 🙂

Love this song, the memories it triggers and the sentiment

Well you didn’t wake up this morning ’cause you didn’t go to bed
You were watching the whites of your eyes turn red
The calendar on your wall is ticking the days off
You’ve been reading some old letters
You smile and think how much you’ve changed
All the money in the world couldn’t buy back those days

You pull back the curtains, and the sun burns into your eyes
You watch a plane flying across a clear blue sky
This is the day your life will surely change
This is the day when things fall into place

You could’ve done anything, if you’d wanted
And all your friends and family think that you’re lucky
But the side of you they’ll never see
Is when you’re left alone with the memories
That hold your life together like glue

You pull back the curtains, and the sun burns into your eyes
You watch a plane flying across a clear blue sky
This is the day your life will surely change
This is the day when things fall into place

This is the day your life will surely change
This is the day your life will surely change
This is the day your life will surely change

Maybe this is the day your life will change?  For me this was the day 650 days ago today 😀  We’re running our How to Quit Drinking workshop in London tomorrow.  2 places still available and you can register here:

Rebound anxiety and booze

This post is triggered by an article I read called ‘The Weird Reason Why Drinking Alcohol Can Make You Feel Anxious the Next Day’.

This is what the article said:

Whenever I drink alcohol, I feel anxious the next day. Why?

You know the bodily symptoms of a hangover: fatigue, headache, and nausea. But anxiety and other mood problems (like irritability or feeling down) are also pretty common effects of drinking. For some people, these can be intense: If you have panic disorder, for example, heavy imbibing 
can trigger a panic attack, complete with shortness of breath and chest pain.

What gives? As your body removes the alcohol from your system, two things happen: Your blood sugar drops (because your body is diverting energy 
to excreting the booze rather than maintaining healthy glucose levels) and inflammation kicks in. Studies link the latter to mood changes and memory issues; an uptick in inflammatory chemicals can affect your nervous system. And low blood sugar can lead to feelings of nervousness.

Finally, because alcohol famously lowers your inhibitions, you might also 
be worried about your actions from the night before.

The best advice is to stick to one drink and never have more than two in one night. You can also try drinking water in between your cocktails.

But it got me thinking about rebound anxiety that is also experience with drinking and I think it is partly fuelled by this physiological explanation but that doesn’t take account of the psychological symptoms.

The term rebound anxiety is nearly always used to refer to the difficulties many people have when attempting to withdraw from certain medications prescribed for anxiety.  It is defined as ‘the relative worsening of symptoms on discontinuation of treatment as compared to baseline symptoms’.

pharmacology-of-anxiolytic-sedativehypnotics-2-35-638

But many of us self-medicated our anxiety with booze.  Ergo we suffer the same effects of withdrawing from booze as someone does if withdrawing from anti-anxiety meds.  For me this is confirmed by the fact that anxiety meds are used during a medical detox from alcohol as a way to manage the unpleasant symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.  I also know that managing a medical detox for someone who is addicted to both alcohol and anxiety medication is the most difficult and dangerous detox to manage.

So we all suffer rebound anxiety when we stop drinking to some lesser or greater extent.  As the Health Central piece about rebound anxiety concludes:

Recovery is a process and it is one that can’t be rushed. The goals need to quite modest and always attainable. Sometimes there will be days when all progress appears to have been lost, but overall, the two-steps forward and sometimes one-back approach is part of the deal, which people need to be aware of. The motivation to get better however is hugely important.