Daily Archives: 13/01/2017

Guest Post: Finding the Link Between Substance Abuse and Schizophrenia

pt_figure_dopamine-pathways-in-schizophrenia_53127-pngI was contacted on email by Justin in November who said; “I am a recovering addict and content writer interested in providing a guest post article.  In my path to recovery I’ve taken to writing content about addiction, recovery and substance abuse through my treatment program.”  Here’s what he wrote about substance abuse and schizophrenia:

New studies have found a link between substance abuse and schizophrenia.  While the relationship between mental health and substance abuse is an incredibly complex one, a group of Denmark researchers have determined that abuse of virtually every type of drug can contribute to mental deterioration and eventual, schizophrenia.

A common misconception about schizophrenia is that those afflicted have split personality disorder or multiple personalities.  However, this has been determined false, as most people suffering from schizophrenia are non violent and lead fairly normal lives, posing no immediate threat to others. Per the National Institute of Mental Health:

“Schizophrenia is a chronic and severe mental disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels, and behaves. People with schizophrenia may seem like they have lost touch with reality. Although schizophrenia is not as common as other mental disorders, the symptoms can be very disabling.”

Rather than split personality disorder, which is a separate diagnosis, those suffering from early onset schizophrenia can experience a decrease in mental processing, rational thinking and general mental well being.  Furthermore, in can take years for schizophrenia to fully develop and during this time, can manifest itself as more common mental health disorders like depression and anxiety.

So what environmental and societal factors can worsen these symptoms into full blown schizophrenia?

The new Denmark study has determined that substance abuse can not only trigger schizophrenia in people genetically at risk, but also increase the chances of developing schizophrenia by up to six times.

While the direct cause and effect relationship between substance abuse and schizophrenia is tremendously complex, the study found the following increases in risk:

  • Cannabis: 5.2 times
  • Alcohol: 3.4 times
  • Hallucinogenic drugs: 1.9 times
  • Sedatives: 1.7 times
  • Amphetamines: 1.24 times
  • Other substances: 2.8 times.

The study notes, while the effects are not often immediately noticed, symptoms of schizophrenia as it relates to drug abuse, often surface later in life: sometimes ten to fifteen years after the substance abuse diagnosis.

Mental health and substance abuse treatment centers often offer dual diagnosis programs for this exact reason, noting that symptoms of schizophrenia can be coupled with drug use.

A particularly worrisome finding of the study is the risk found with two of the most prevalent substances, marijuana and alcohol.  While marijuana is federally illegal, it is used medicinally and recreationally in many stages, including California.  A large factor in the correlation found between cannabis and schizophrenia is due to the fact that people can be exposed to it second hand.  That is to say, unlike most other substances (not smoked), marijuana can be introduced to people’s systems indirectly, simply by being in close proximity of someone that is using the drug.

Alcohol on the other hand, tops the list, as it’s the most socially acceptable and easily obtainable substance given it’s legal place in American media and culture.

While the newly discovered findings presented by the Denmark study do not provide us with a black and white relationship between schizophrenia and substance abuse, the evidence is undeniable: The prolonged abuse of illicit drugs and alcohol increases the risk of developing schizophrenic tendencies and symptoms later in life.

Article courtesy of the team at Muse Treatment

Thank you Justin!