Monthly Archives: March 2017

#alcoholfreekids

This was released by Alcohol Focus Scotland earlier this month.   In the report leading academics and health experts outline how the Scottish Government can reduce the unacceptably high levels of alcohol marketing that children and young people are exposed to. (#alcoholfreekids)

Removing alcohol adverts from streets and public transport, and phasing out alcohol sponsorship in sport are among the steps that should be taken to prevent alcohol companies reaching our children.

Children are very familiar with and influenced by alcohol brands and advertising campaigns, despite codes of practice which are supposed to protect them. There is clear evidence that exposure to alcohol marketing leads children to start drinking at a younger age and to drink more if they are already drinking.

Alcohol Focus Scotland was asked by Ministers to facilitate an international expert group on alcohol marketing to advise on the most effective policy options available and how they might be implemented in Scotland.

The group’s recommendations include:

  • removing alcohol marketing from public spaces such as streets, parks, sports grounds and on public transport
  • ending alcohol sponsorship of sports, music and cultural events
  • pressing the UK Government to introduce restrictions on TV alcohol advertising between 6am and 11pm, and to restrict cinema alcohol advertising to 18-certificate films
  • limiting alcohol advertising in newspapers and magazines to publications aimed at adults
  • restricting alcohol marketing on social networking sites

The report also recommends setting up an independent task force on alcohol marketing to remove the regulatory role of the alcohol industry.

More than 30 organisations, including Children 1st, the Scottish Cancer Prevention Network and the medical Royal Colleges, as well as the majority of MSPs (72), have pledged their support to end alcohol marketing in childhood. This report now outlines specific actions which could be taken to achieve that.

Professor Gerard Hastings, one of the group members and internationally renowned expert on social marketing, said:

“Self-regulation does not work; it will not control dishonest banks, over-claiming MPs – or profit-driven multinational drinks companies. And yet we continue to rely on it to protect our children from alcohol marketing. It is no surprise that study after study has shown that, as a result, children are being put in harm’s way – and that parents want policy makers to be more courageous. Scotland now has a chance to grasp this nettle and show how independent statutory regulation of marketing can provide our young people the protection they deserve. The international community is trusting us to take the same public health lead we took on smoke-free public places and minimum unit pricing; let us show them that we will.”

Alison Douglas, Chief Executive of Alcohol Focus Scotland, said:

“An alcohol-free childhood is the healthiest and best option, yet we allow alcohol companies to reach our children from a young age. They are seeing and hearing positive messages about alcohol when waiting for the school bus, watching the football, at the cinema or using social media. We need to create environments that foster positive choices and support children’s healthy development. We hope Ministers will respond to this report and the groundswell of support for effective alcohol marketing restrictions in Scotland.”

Tam Baillie, Children and Young People’s Commissioner Scotland said:

“I strongly support this report which provides clear evidence on the nature and reach of alcohol marketing and makes welcome and sensible proposals to safeguard our children. All children and young people have the right to good health and that must include the right to grow up free from commercial pressures to drink alcohol. The extent of the actions we take now are a good measure of the value we place on our children for the future.”

Summary (pdf) and full Report (pdf)

Sober Inspiration: The Tao of Fully Feeling

So I’m reading a new book that I heard talked about recently by Pete Walker called The Tao of Fully Feeling.  I’m only a few pages in but text is already jumping out at me and screaming to be shared!

Here’s the opening:

Feelings and emotions are energetic states that do not magically dissipate when they are ignored.  When we do not attend to our feelings, they accumulate inside us and create a mounting anxiety that we commonly dismiss as stress.

So, like so many of us, I believed that all those years of pouring wine down my neck to manage ‘stress’ was helpful.  In reality I was busy self-medicating away my feelings and emotions.

I felt that emotions were something to be corralled, minimised, denied even.  In my household growing up we ‘didn’t do’ emotions as we were often reminded.  I now understand that we weren’t allowed to do negative emotions.  I learned very early on to keep my head down, my mouth shut and a smile on my face.  Look happy even if you were dying inside.  No wonder I ended up emotionally constipated and believing that drinking allowed me to express my emotions fully because it was only in that dis-inhibited state that I actually heard them as they roared from their cage inside.  “A drunk mind speaks a sober heart” right?  A saying often attributed to French Enlightenment philosopher Jean-Jaques Rousseau which we know not to be true.

Pete goes on:

We can learn to be emotional in benign ways.  We can have our emotions without holding onto them.  We can soften and relax into our feelings without exiling or enshrining them.  We can let our feelings pass through us when they have fully served their function.  When we learn to experience our feelings directly, we eventually discover that surrendering to them is by far the most efficient – and, in the long run, least painful – way of responding to them.  We realise first-hand that life does not have to be pain-free to be fully enjoyed.  Life is inordinately more painful than necessary when we hate, shame, and abandon ourselves for not feeling ‘good.’

As we become more emotionally whole, our health and vitality naturally improve.  When we disburden ourselves of old unresolved trauma, energy wasted holding the past at bay becomes available for celebrating daily life.  As we learn to befriend our emotions, we suffer less and less from self-damaging flights from feelings.  We gracefully accept the reality that our emotional nature, like the weather, often changes unpredictably with a variety of pleasant and unpleasant conditions.  We realize that a positive feeling cannot be induced to persist any more than the sun can be forced to continuously shine.

And this reflects my experience over the last 3 1/2 years.  Emotions are no longer something to be scared of but welcomed and embraced, whether happy, sad or mad.  My emotional repertoire has grown incredibly as I have allowed my caged and numbed heart to feel what my head was taught to deny for so long.

Welcome to emotional recovery that forms the biggest part of recovery from addiction.  I think I’m going to really enjoy this book 🙂

 

Radical ketamine therapy could treat alcohol addiction

This was featured in The Guardian in January whereby a one-off dose of the drug, ketamine could help alcohol addicts reduce their intake by ‘erasing’ drink-related memories, say psychologists testing treatment.

Ketamine is used as an anaesthetic agent and also in terminal care in my professional experience and as a recreational drug in my personal experience.

Here’s what the researchers say:

Scientists believe that a radical treatment involving the tranquilliser ketamine could help overcome alcohol addiction by “erasing” drink-related memories.

Psychologists based at University College London are testing whether a one-off dose of the drug could help hazardous drinkers who are trying to reduce their alcohol intake. Alcohol addiction is notoriously difficult to treat, and there are few effective therapies available.

Using a recreational drug to treat addiction may sound counterintuitive, but the researchers say there is a growing body of research suggesting that ketamine can be used to disrupt harmful patterns of behaviour.

Ravi Das, one of the lead researchers, said: “There is evidence that it could be useful as a treatment for alcoholism.”

Crucially, ketamine can disrupt the formation of memories, and scientists believe that this property could be harnessed to over-write the memories that drive addiction and harmful patterns of behaviour.

“Memories that you form can be hijacked by drugs in some people,” said Das. “If you were an alcoholic you might have a strong memory of being in a certain place and wanting to drink. Those memories get continuously triggered by things in the environment that you can’t avoid.”

For instance, seeing a glass of beer, hearing the clinking of glasses or even arriving home from work may trigger memories of the rewarding sensation of taking a drink – and might prompt a person to follow this urge.

“The main problem is the really high relapse rate after treatment,” said Das. “People can successfully quit using over the short term while they’re being monitored in the hospital … but when they return home they’re exposed to those environmental triggers again.”

There is increasing evidence, however, that memories are less stable than once assumed and may be open to manipulation.

Each time our brain accesses a memory, the neural connections that encode it are temporarily destabilised, meaning that our recollection can be slightly altered before it goes back into storage. This is one reason why, in everyday life, people can recall wildly different versions of the same events.

In the clinic, scientists believe this short period of instability, represents a window of opportunity. Ketamine blocks a brain receptor called NMDA, which is required for the formation of memories. So the logic is that giving someone the drug just as a memory has been destabilised could help weaken the memory, or even erase it.

A similar approach with a different drug was shown to eradicate people’s phobia of spiders. And research in rats that were made to be addicted to cocaine showed that the memories underpinning their addiction could be completely wiped out using a similar strategy (although this involved injecting a chemical into the brain).

In the UCL trial, the scientists will intentionally trigger alcohol-related memories by placing a glass of beer in front of the participants, who are all heavy drinkers. They will then disrupt the memory, by surprising the participant (the team is not disclosing the exact details as this could bias the results).

Participants will then be given either a ketamine infusion, with a concentration equivalent to a high recreational dose, or a placebo. The team will follow up the people for a year and monitor whether their drinking has changed and by how much.

In total the scientists are aiming to include 90 people in the trial and more than 50 have already taken part. It involves people who drink harmful quantities of alcohol, but excludes anyone who meets the clinical criteria for alcoholism. The participants were drinking at least 40 units for men (equivalent to four bottles of strong wine) and 28 units for women, and drinking on at least four days.

Nikki, 31, who works as a consultant in London said she decided to take part in the study when she had some time off between jobs and realised she was drinking more than she wanted to. “It’s just in the culture, that’s what all my friends are like. Everyone drinks to excess,” she said.

She described the experience of being given the ketamine as “overwhelming and intense”, but not unpleasant. “My body felt like it was melting away,” she said. “It was quite psychedelic, I felt untethered from my body.”

In the week after the session, she said, she felt in an “incredibly positive mood” and that since taking part she has been more conscious about deciding whether to have a drink, although said this could also be linked to starting a new job and taking up meditation. “In the past, there were occasions where I would be drinking and I’d be on autopilot ‘Let’s get another drink’,” she said.

If the trial yields promising results, the team hope that the approach could form the basis for therapy sessions targeted at alcoholics and people who are drinking unhealthily. However, they acknowledge that there may be resistance to the use of a recreational drug to treat people with addiction.

“There’s just the general social attitude that everything that’s illegal is terrible. There will obviously be that kind of narrow-sighted pushback,” said Das. “But if it’s safe and effective enough it should be recommended.”

Andrew Misell, a spokesman for Alcohol Concern, said: “The researchers have quite rightly highlighted what a lot of people in recovery from alcohol problems know from experience, namely that cues or triggers like the smell of beer can cause a relapse even after long periods of abstinence. Any work looking at how people can overcome these pitfalls is going to be useful.”

However, he added, no drug-based therapy is risk-free “and that certainly includes ketamine”.

Professor Michael Saladin, of the Medical University of South Carolina, is looking at similar approaches to help people quit smoking. “There is a vast animal research literature that suggests memories can be manipulated following reactivation,” he said. “I am convinced that there is sufficient evidence to believe that memory reconsolidation can be harnessed for clinical purposes.”

The Evening Standard also picked up on the research:

Researchers at University College London are trialling the use of ketamine, a powerful anaesthetic used in the NHS and on animals, to block or dismantle the “alcohol reward” memories that cause cravings and addictions. It is hoped the drug, known as ‘Special K’ on the party scene, will help drinkers “reboot” their brain and get their habit under control.

Well I’m all for research and trying new things if it will potentially help.  Although I’d be slightly concerned about cross-addiction because if it is a very pleasant experience people may wish and seek to repeat it and ketamine is available as a street drug.

Sober Inspiration: Dan Siegel Wheel of Awareness

drdansiegel_wheelofawarenessSo the further into recovery I’ve got the more mindful and conscious I have become and in fact my awareness continues to deepen all the time.  With that in mind I wanted to share with you Dan Siegel‘s work on the Wheel of Awareness.  The reason I’m posting this today is because yesterday he led a meeting in LA to mark the beginning of his ‘Wheel of Awareness Community’.

Here is an image of “The Wheel of Awareness.” The hub represents the experience of awareness itself — knowing — while the rim contains all the points of anything we can become aware of, that which is known to us. We can send a spoke out to the rim to focus our attention on one point or another on the rim. In this way, the wheel of awareness becomes a visual metaphor for the integration of consciousness as we differentiate rim-elements and hub-awareness from each other and link them with our focus of attention.

I attach below a presentation on the subject that Dan has shared on SlidePlayer:

Mindsight Presentation by Dr Dan Siegel

And now a Youtube guided meditation that he has created:

And then finally the pdf handout that was created by him to support our further understanding of the Wheel of Awareness:

wheelofawareness-guided-meditation

The total package free on the internet from him – how wonderful is that? 🙂

For me this is what it is all about now.  Deepening my  understanding and integration of my sixth, seventh and eighth senses – so my somatics and my ability to perceive my mind by reflecting on my experience.  As Dr Siegel says:

“When we carry out a mindfulness practice of focused awareness, we develop mindsight”

Here’s to that and me finally acting on all the universes hints that I need to start a yoga practice to compliment my running!

NICE guidance on dual diagnosis 2016

This is not the first time that Dual Diagnosis has been discussed on this blog (you can read them all here).  However we now have official guidance from the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) on the issue.

My lovely friend Libby Ranzetta did an excellent synopsis that garnered praise on Twitter from the NICE guidelines chair themselves no less! 🙂

Over to her summary detailed over at Alcohol Policy UK:

New NICE guidance on dual diagnosis was released in November 2016: Coexisting severe mental illness and substance misuse: community health and social care services.

The guidance and supporting tools and resources sets out how services for those dually diagnosed aged 14 and above should be improved to ‘provide a range of coordinated services that address people’s wider health and social care needs, as well as other issues such as employment and housing.’

NICE has also produced a guideline on coexisting severe mental illness (psychosis) and substance misuse: assessment and management in healthcare settings.

Context and definitions

NICE contextualises the guidance by stating that adults and young people with coexisting severe mental illness and substance misuse have some of the worst health, wellbeing and social outcomes (details here). It is not clear how many people in the UK experience dual diagnosis issues, partly because some people in this group do not use services or get relevant care or treatment (see previous post).

The Department of Health’s Refocusing the Care Programme Approach identifies people with dual diagnosis as one of the groups in need of an enhanced Care Programme Approach. That is because they are not being identified consistently and services are sometimes failing to provide the support they need. The policy highlights the need for a whole systems approach to their care, involving a range of services and organisations working together. This guideline, NICE claims, aims to address this need.

In announcing the guidance, Professor Alan Maryon-Davis, chair of the guideline committee, spoke frankly about the challenges coexisting substance misuse and mental health problems pose for patients and practitioners alike.

“People with dual diagnosis almost always have multiple needs – often with physical health and social issues as well as their dual mental health and substance problem. They are often unemployed or struggling to hold onto a job. They may be in debt, homeless or poorly housed. They could even be in an abusive relationship.

To add to their woes, they are also more likely to be stereotyped and stigmatised. They are often regarded as unreliable, feckless, difficult to engage, aggressive or abusive.

As a result, they tend to get shunted around the various services they need support from with no-one wanting to take responsibility for them. This can all too easily lead to a downward spiral and sooner or later a crisis – perhaps forcing them into A&E, or on the streets. They may even find themselves in the magistrate’s court.

This is why our NICE guideline is so desperately needed.”

For Guideline 58 the age cut-off for young people has been set at 14 to reflect the small numbers affected below this age and the fact that many early intervention services usually start at age 14. ‘Substance misuse’ refers to the use of legal or illicit drugs, including alcohol and medicine, in a way that causes mental or physical damage.

‘Severe mental illness’ includes a clinical diagnosis of:

  • schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders, or
  • bipolar affective disorder, or
  • severe depressive episodes with or without psychotic episodes.

NICE Recommendations

The guideline is arranged as series of detailed recommendations on the following:

  • first contact with services
  • referral to secondary care mental health services
  • the care plan: multi-agency approach to address physical health, social care, housing and other support needs
  • partnership working between specialist services, health, social care and other support services and commissioners
  • improving service delivery
  • maintaining contact between services and people with coexisting severe mental illness and substance misuse who use them

Drug and Alcohol Findings Bank has provided a summary of the key recommendations here.

Professor Maryon-Davis summed up two main messages from the recommendations:

“First, there has to be much wider recognition that this group of people, despite their complexities, have as much right to dedicated care and support as anyone else. They should not be turned away or left to flounder. Every effort should be made to help them benefit from the services they so badly need. Crucial to this is a non-judgmental, empathetic approach and the building up of mutual respect and trust.

And secondly, good communication is key! Staff working in mental health, substance misuse, primary care, social care, housing, employment, benefits, criminal justice and the voluntary sector need to have strong leadership to ensure that they are all working together as best they can. We recommend that this can be best achieved by having a dedicated care coordinators.”

What happens next

Substance misuse practitioners could be forgiven for saying they have heard these messages before; messages which have not made much difference to the way mental health services respond to dual diagnosis. Last year the Recovery Partnership’s Review of Alcohol Treatment Services found a clear failure of services to meet the needs of people with dual diagnosis, summarising the policy context for such failure as follows:

“National guidance on the management of this [dual diagnosis] group was first published by the Department of Health in 2002. NICE published further guidance on psychosis with coexisting substance misuse in 2011.

However, the… situation has not improved and may be worsening because budgets have been cut in mental health services, and because mental health services are now commissioned by a separate body (Clinical Commissioning Groups) from alcohol services (Public Health). This represents a real blockage in the pathway of care for problem drinkers (and drug users), a blockage that cannot be easily resolved at the local level.”

Other questions may relate to possible missed opportunities to address low level mental health problems and substance misuse. For instance Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services – which exist for those mild to moderate mental health difficulties, such as depression, anxiety and phobias – are not mentioned within the guidance. IAPT though may be considered an ideal setting for brief intervention given the link between alcohol misuse and problems such as anxiety and depression, yet few IAPT services appear to routinely deliver IBA (although guidance was released for IAPT roles in 2012).

In 2014 an analysis suggested cognitive based therapy (CBT) and/or motivational interviewing (MI) for comorbid alcohol use disorder and major depressive disorder produced small but robust beneficial effects on both depression and alcohol consumption – regardless of whether delivered by mental health or subtance misuse roles.

Commissioners and service providers though will now be expected to use Guideline 58 to improve the quality of care given to people with dual diagnosis involving severe mental health problems. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) use NICE guidelines and quality standards as evidence for inspections, to inform the award of good and outstanding ratings. CQC’s inspection regime and associated powers may well provide the impetus needed for real change to happen this time.

Sober Inspiration: Tiny Beautiful Things

Oh man.  I watched an interview with Cheryl Strayed recently and it compelled me to seek out her writing.  I’d already seen the film Wild and it had reduced me to tears so I knew what this women had to say would resonate – if you haven’t seen the film I’ve left the trailer below as encouragement 😉 Same age, difficult experiences, truth teller – my kind of woman!   And so I ordered Tiny Beautiful Things from the library and have not been disappointed.  As Amazon writes: ‘This bestselling book from the author of Wild collects the best of The Rumpus’s Dear Sugar advice columns plus never-before-published pieces. Rich with humor, insight, compassion—and absolute honesty—this book is a balm for everything life throws our way.’

Here’s just a few of her gems:

There’s a saying about drug addicts that they stop maturing emotionally at the age they start using, and I’ve known enough addicts to believe this to be true enough.”

The healing power of even the most microscopic exchange with someone who knows in a flash precisely what you’re talking about because she experienced that thing too cannot be overestimated….. Find online communities where you can have conversations with people during which you don’t have to pretend a thing….. This is how you get unstuck.  You reach….. She had to want it more than she’d wanted anything.  She had to grab like a drowning girl for every good thing that came her way and swim like fuck away from every bad thing.  She had to count the years and let them roll by, to grow up and then run as fast as she could in the direction of her best and happiest dreams across the bridge that was built by her own desire to heal.

Acceptance has everything to do with simplicity, with sitting in the ordinary place, with bearing witness to the plain facts of our life, with not just starting at the essential, but ending up there.  Acceptance asks only that you embrace what’s true.  Allow your acceptance to be a transformative experience.  You do that by simply looking it square in the face and then moving on.  You don’t have to move fast or far.  You can go just an inch.  You can mark your progress breath by breathI have breathed my way through so many people who I felt wronged by; through so many situations I couldn’t change.  Sometimes while doing this I have breathed in acceptance and breathed out love.  Sometimes I’ve breathed in gratitude and out forgiveness.  Sometimes I haven’t been able to muster anything beyond the breath itself, my mind forced blank with nothing but the desire to be free of sorrow and rage.

Self-pity is a dead-end road.  You make the choice to drive down it.  It’s up to you to decide to stay parked there or to turn around and drive out.”

When bad things happen, often the only way back to wholeness is to take it all apart.”

I’ll leave you with this:

What if I forgave myself? I thought. What if I forgave myself even though I’d done something I shouldn’t have? What if I was a liar and a cheat and there was no excuse for what I’d done other than because it was what I wanted and needed to do? What if I was sorry, but if I could go back in time I wouldn’t do anything differently than I had done? What if I’d actually wanted to fuck every one of those men? What if heroin taught me something? What if yes was the right answer instead of no? What if what made me do all those things everyone thought I shouldn’t have done was what also had got me here? What if I was never redeemed? What if I already was?
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail

Liver Transplantation

So I realised when I read this news story that I hadn’t actually ever detailed the liver and transplantation on the blog!  As reported by Alcohol Policy UK earlier this month: Liver transplants have been highlighted by an Eastenders storyline featuring Phil Mitchell (pictured as played by Steve McFadden) suffering with alcohol-related liver disease, reported the Express. The storyline has been praised by Sally Johnson, Director of Organ Donation and Transplantation for NHS Blood and Transplant, who said it had been portrayed responsibly. The Express followed up with the article Liver disease warning: How much damage are YOU doing to your vital organ?

So firstly lets look at how important the liver is and what function within the body it serves.

Your liver has around 500 different functions.  Importantly it:
  • fights infections and disease (which is why I struggled more with illness when I drank)
  • destroys and deals with poisons and drugs (which alcohol is)
  • filters and cleans the blood
  • controls the amount of cholesterol
  • produces and maintains the balance of hormones (hence why women get an increase in breast cancer rates with drinking and men get gynaecomastia, otherwise known as “man boobs” or “moobs”)
  • produces chemicals – enzymes and other proteins – responsible for most of the chemical reactions in the body, for example , blood clotting and repairing tissue (which is why wound healing is slower)
  • processes food once it has been digested (hence why alcoholics are very often severely malnourished)
  • produces bile to help break down food in the gut (and why jaundice is an early sign of liver distress)
  • stores energy that can be used rapidly when the body needs it most
  • stores sugars, vitamins and minerals, including iron
  • repairs damage and renews itself

So it is a major organ without which we die.

By the time you discover you need a transplant your liver might begin to fail and your quality of life may be very poor. You may have experienced the following symptoms:

  • loss of appetite
  • generally feeling unwell and being tired all the time
  • feeling sick and being sick
  • very itchy skin
  • loss of weight and muscle wasting
  • enlarged and tender liver (you may feel very tender below your right ribs)
  • increased sensitivity to alcohol and drugs (medical and recreational)
  • yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice)
  • swelling of the lower abdomen, or tummy (ascites), or the legs (peripheral oedema)
  • fever with high temperatures and shivers, often caused by an infection
  • vomiting blood
  • dark black tarry stools (faeces) or pale stools, associated with cholestatic disease
  • periods of mental confusion.

What is a liver transplant?

A liver transplant is an operation where your diseased liver is removed and replaced with a healthy donor human liver. Although liver transplants are now quite common, the operation is not undertaken lightly. It is a major operation and the body will always see the ‘new’ liver as a foreign agent and will try to destroy it. This means that if you have a liver transplant you will have to take medication for the rest of your life to stop your body rejecting the donor liver.

If you want to read the award winning leaflet about transplantation you can do so here.
If you want to read how a liver transplant is performed go here.
You will have to abstain from alcohol for at least 6 months prior to transplantation.
You will have to take immuno-suppressant drugs for the rest of your life to stop your body rejecting the new liver and regular blood tests to monitor.  These drugs carry their own risks and side effects such as:
  • kidney damage
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • obesity
  • higher risk of infections

It may restrict your travel options in the future and you will carry a higher risk of skin cancer.

For further information visit: British Liver Trust

And if you want to study the liver further there is a MOOC run by the University of Birmingham you can do free online: Liver Disease: Looking after Your Liver

It is not a miracle cure or the answer to your drinking prayers.  And those alcoholics who drink after receiving a donor liver leave me feeling very conflicted indeed – and yes I have met them ……

 

Friday Sober Jukebox: loud music and getting out of my head (h/t Fat Boy Slim!)

So I was thinking about the fact that I run the Friday sober jukebox and why music (turned up ear bleed loud) continues to be so important to me as a way of getting out of my head.  This also then tied in with some wisdom from Focus12 and another sober bloggers writing about impulsivity I read recently (thanks Rachel for sharing the links!).

I was driving along for work and had the stereo turned up really loud belting out a tune when I remembered some of the rules that Focus12 had for their clients during treatment.

There were a list of activities and substances they were not allowed to have or engage in while resident and working on their fledgling sobriety.  These included:

  • Speakers for playing loud music
  • Henna or ink tattoos
  • Piercings
  • Red Bull or similar energy drinks
  • Permission needed to go to the cinema
  • Permission to go the gym more than a couple of times a week
  • Too much non-food shopping was challenged
  • They were encouraged not to spend too much time watching television
  • No laptops, tablets, gaming systems or e-readers
  • Restricted use of mobile phones

This is because these are all ways of changing the way we feel or allowing ourselves to escape in some way.  The counselling team felt with music systems and mobile phones if you were distracting yourself too much or becoming too involved with the ‘outside world’ that it would be to the detriment of the programme of treatment.  And I have to agree because the reason I love loud music is for that very reason – it assaults my ears and takes me somewhere else, either deep in memories or thoughts away from the here and now.  It gets me out of my head!

As Rachel writes for Sober Nation, “How about tattoos? Getting ink can be impulsive – but I absolutely love it, and oh the tattoo high fills in all kinds of voids.”  So not just me with my music then?

She goes on to say, “Anything done in excess has the potential to be an issue. The purpose of all this is to get you to think about the impulsive behavior and how it relates to alcoholism or addiction, and to let you know you’re not alone. It’s not weak to have cravings for some adventure you’re lacking in the present, in fact, it’s completely normal for those in recovery.”

Wanderlust? Adventure you say?  Again ringing bells for me too!

She ends her piece with this really good question:

What’s filling that void, the itch you can’t scratch? Is it healthy?

I would argue that if you aren’t doing it to excess and it gives you joy and it isn’t booze – all power to you, go get out of your head! 😉