Guest Blog Post from Alcohol Concern and Dry January

It’s almost that time of year again!  Today I’m honoured to feature a guest blog post written for the blog by Alcohol Concern to promote their soon to be active Dry January campaign which kicks off in a few days!

Over to Alcohol Concern:

Dry January feels like it’s been around forever, doesn’t it? It’s as ubiquitous to January as New Year’s resolutions and the post-Christmas belly. But how much do you know about it?

Dry January is an annual behaviour change campaign, which encourages people to give up alcohol for the month of January. A YouGov poll commissioned by charity Alcohol Concern has revealed that an estimated 3.1 million people[1] in the UK are already planning to do Dry January in 2018. They will ditch the booze for one month to feel healthier, save money and re-set their relationship with alcohol.  

The campaign is run by national charity Alcohol Concern, which merged with Alcohol Research UK in April to become an even stronger advocate for a world in which alcohol causes no harm.  

In 2012 a woman named Emily Robinson joined Alcohol Concern. She had decided to give up alcohol for January, and absolutely everyone wanted to talk to her about it. She was having lots of conversations about alcohol and the benefits of taking a break from drinking – just the kinds of conversations Alcohol Concern wants to have on a wider scale. The national Dry January campaign was born.

Dry January has gone from zero to over five million participants in five years. This is its sixth year running, and we’re expecting the biggest year yet. Dry January now looks suspiciously like a movement – a movement of people who want to be in charge of when, what and how much they drink. Someone you know will be doing it. Probably more than one. Maybe your whole family. Maybe your whole office. Probably not the whole country but hey – we can dream.

Dry January is  quite different to Sober for October (run by Macmillan Cancer Support) or the Dryathlon (run by Cancer Research UK), because it’s about YOU. It’s not about raising money for charity (though if you want to, you can do that through Dry January). It’s not about giving something up.

Cutting alcohol out for a month can result in some amazing benefits to health – alcohol puts strain on the body, can disrupt sleep, have a negative impact on skin, and cause weight gain. Going dry for a month can work wonders for people financially, as the average person in the UK spends £50,000 on booze over their lifetime. Additionally, Dry January allows people to develop a new relationship with alcohol and learn the skills needed to say no when they don’t fancy a drink. Two-thirds of people who attempt Dry January make it through the month without drinking, while 72% maintain lower levels of harmful drinking than before Dry January six months later. [2]

Public Health England has endorsed Dry January, saying “Dry January is based on sound behavioural principles and our previous evaluation of the campaign shows that for some people it can help them re-set their drinking patterns for weeks or even months after completing the challenge.”

People can sign up for Dry January at dryjanuary.org.uk, or by downloading the Dry January & Beyond app via the App Store or Google Play. People who sign up to Dry January are more likely to make it through to the end of the month without drinking. They get access to support, tips and tricks, prize draws, and the app, with features including a unit calculator, calorie counter and money-saved tracker. Dry January is for anyone and everyone. Even if you already don’t drink, signing up and sharing the campaign can encourage others to do the same.

To sum up, here’s a quote from blogger Jenna Haldene, who reckons you should give Dry January a go.

“I didn’t think I felt bad at the time. I assumed that it was normal to feel tired and slightly sluggish, and that it was just a side effect of getting older. It wasn’t until I gave my body a much-needed break from alcohol that I realised how much potential I had to feel amazing.”

Sign up for Dry January now.

Read Jenna’s whole blog about cutting out booze here.

If you drink very heavily or experience physical withdrawal symptoms when not drinking alcohol, then Dry January is probably not for you. Instead, you should seek support from your GP or alcohol services; find out what’s available in your area here. Unsure if this applies to you? Try our alcohol audit.  

[1] The poll found that 6% of UK adults are planning to do Dry January. Figure of 3.1 million UK adults planning to do Dry January: total population aged 18+ in the UK 51,767,543 (ONS, Population Estimates for UK: mid-2016, table MYE2); 51,767,543 x .06 = 3,106,053.  

[2] Evaluation by University of Sussex, School of Psychology 2014

4 thoughts on “Guest Blog Post from Alcohol Concern and Dry January

  1. 3.1 million people – that’s absolutely brilliant! Such good news that so many are taking steps to understand and hopefully change their relationship with alcohol.

  2. Great post, Lou I’m so happy it’s increasing it popularity, maybe one day be right up there with increased gym memberships in January!

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